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Claude Wyle
Claude Wyle
Attorney • 888-787-5718

Honda Fined $70,000,000.00 For Failing To Report Injuries and Death Claims

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Honda, the embattled car manufacturer accused of failing to report 1,729 death and injury claims to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, agreed to pay 70 million dollars in fines as a settlement of the government’s claims against the company.

The car company, who, according to the NHTSA “(failed) to comply with laws that safeguard the public” learned about the problem with their vehicles in late 2011, yet failed to correct the error and did not disclose the issue until three years later.

The issue? An airbag failure, courtesy of fellow Japan-based airbag manufacturer, Takata.

But the problem doesn’t just lie with Honda and Takata. Investigators are starting to question the NHTSA itself. And why? No follow up.

The NHTSA knew fairly early on about the issues but just as Honda didn’t offer any disclosure to the public of such issues, the NHTSA also knew fairly early on and did not respond appropriately.

In fact, the NHTSA has had a number of flops recently, where findings show the agency knew about the impeding troubles, yet did nothing to proactively fix the issue.

Both the Toyota Unintended Acceleration issue and the GM Ignition Switch issue were cases of NHTSA’s delayed action or outright failure to act. The Honda Airbag issue is just another in a line of inaction by the NHTSA.

Even the NHTSA’s newest administrator, Mark Rosekind, has identified a number of gaps in their organization, and admits that some restructuring may be needed.

It seems that not knowing isn’t the NHTSA’s problem, it’s not doing.

And as a dangerous product attorney, I can tell you from personal experience, it’s not always what you do, it’s what you don’t do.

But, I don’t want to be too harsh or judgmental with the government as they have their hands full, usually. I do want to remind everyone that it is the Civil Justice System which best safeguards the safety of our families from dangerous and defective products. The government sets what are most often the lowest minimum standards, yet that does not mean that manufacturers are keeping up with standards of safety in their own industries. The system that keeps manufacturers honest, and that un-earth’s most of the abuses and hidden defects is our Civil Court system.

 

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Hello, I’m Claude Wyle, a San Francisco defective and dangerous products attorney. Have an idea for a topic you’d like to see covered here? Feel free to contact me or visit www.ccwlawyers.com